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Details for TexasTransplant


Real name:
Jim Morgan

Location:
Plano, TX

Division:
Men's 70

Messages posted by TexasTransplant »Message board home   »Start a new discussion

Aug. 24, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Micro-fracture Surgery

The doc recommended to one of my BP partners that he have micro-fracture surgery on his right knee. I know a number of professional athletes have had this procedure. Anyone have any experience with it?
Aug. 23, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Bats
Discussion: Bat restrictions for Seniors.

While all of the above is good information, if you are contemplating playing in a local league (as opposed to tournament play) you need to check with local authorities. Local leagues, particularly senior leagues, have been know to have some peculiar rules and restrictions on bats. I am aware of one senior league in the DFW area that only allows old ASA bats (not the ones with the 2013 stamp). You should find plenty of bats for less than $400. Find out from you locals what you need, then do some web searches.

Aug. 9, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: Infield fly rule with a line drive

I've always wondered if the "ordinary effort" provision of the IFR should be judged in relation to the player involved. An "ordinary effort" by a 260 pounder with two knee braces might not get him anywhere near a ball that a 170 pound rabbit can catch with ease.
Aug. 9, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: Infield fly rule with a line drive

Now there's a manager who is quick on his feet!

Aug. 9, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: Infield fly rule with a line drive

This explanation of the Infield Fly Rule is stickied on the umpiring forum of Softballfans.com. by a member who calls himself NCASAUmp. I frequent this forum and he seems to be one o fthe more knowledgeable members. It's a long explanation, but the first line of the second paragraph should answer your question.




Infield Fly Rule
This is perhaps one of the easiest rules in the book that all too frequently gets overcomplicated. Let's break it down step-by-step.

ASA defines an Infield Fly as "a fair fly ball, not including a line drive or an attempted bunt which can be caught by an infielder, pitcher or catcher with ordinary effort when first and second or first, second and third bases are occupied with less than two outs." Every other organization (USSSA, NSA, ISA, SSUSA) defines it in much the same way.


How does the Infield Fly Rule work?

Let's break it down into its four parts:

"A fair fly ball, not including a line drive or an attempted bunt..."
This is one common area where fans get mixed up. Ultimately, the batted ball must be ruled that it was a fair ball for the Infield Fly to be enforced. If the batted ball is ultimately ruled foul, then the batter may not be called out on an Infield Fly. Umpires are advised (though not required) to call "Infield Fly if fair" if the ball could possibly result in a foul ball.

"...which can be caught by an infielder, pitcher or catcher..."
This is the other common area in which fans get mixed up. The key phrase here is "can be caught," not "is caught." The fielder may certainly let the ball drop to the ground, and the Infield Fly Rule can still apply.

"...with ordinary effort..."
This part is where things can get a little tricky. What is "ordinary effort?" This is entirely left up to the judgment of the plate umpire. Typically, if a fielder has to break into an all-out run, this would not be considered "ordinary effort." Some umpires consider it ordinary effort if the fielder does not have to turn his back to the infield. Some umpires consider it ordinary effort if the fielder doesn't have to do more than a light jog. All of these umpires are well within their rights to use these as measures for how they define "ordinary effort," as this is a judgment call.

"...when first and second or first, second and third bases are occupied with less than two outs."
This one speaks for itself. First base and second base must be occupied, or the bases must be loaded. There must also be no outs or one out. If there are two outs, the rule does not apply.

I look at this rule as like a house of cards: if any one part is missing, the whole thing falls apart, and the Infield Fly Rule does not apply. All of these parts must come together in order to form the Infield Fly Rule.


What happens when the Infield Fly Rule is called?
The Infield Fly Rule does only one thing: call the batter-runner out, removing the force on the other runners. That's all it does, nothing more. Beyond that, it's treated just like any other fly ball - runners may attempt to advance at their own risk. If the ball is caught, runners must still tag up after the ball is first touched by the defense. If the ball is not caught, runners are not required to tag up.


Whose call is it anyway?
In ASA, this should be the Plate Umpire's call. The Base Umpire may certainly assist the Plate Umpire in making the determination of an Infield Fly, but ultimately, this is the Plate Umpire's call. Other associations may have different mechanics, but I'm not aware of any such examples.


Some True/False regarding the Infield Fly Rule:
#1: The ball is dead.
Answer: False. The ball is most certainly not dead on an Infield Fly. The ball is always live, and runners may advance at their own risk.

#2: If an infielder drops an Infield Fly, the infield fly is still in effect.
Answer: True. The infielder only has to be able to catch the ball with ordinary effort.

#3: Runners no longer have to tag up the instant the Infield Fly Rule is declared.
Answer: False. It's just like any other fly ball. If it's caught, runners are still required to tag up after the ball is first touched by the defense.

#4: An outfielder can catch an Infield Fly.
Answer: True. So long as an infielder could have caught the ball with ordinary effort, the rule still applies. Just because an outfielder actually caught the ball has no bearing on the Infield Fly Rule.

#5: An Infield Fly landing in the grass is not an Infield Fly.
Answer: False. Again, so long as an infielder could have caught the ball with ordinary effort, the Infield Fly Rule applies. The rule mentions nothing about whether the ball must actually be in the infield.

#6: If a team is missing an infielder (such as their second baseman), and the infield fly lands where s/he would have been, it still counts.
Answer: False. A infielder actually has to be present to be able to catch the ball with ordinary effort.

If you have any questions, please let me know. As always, I may periodically modify this document to reflect common questions regarding the Infield Fly Rule. Please do not reply to this thread, as it will be locked, and all replies will be deleted.

Play ball!
__________________
July 23, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Shoulder Surgery Recovery Time

Rotator cuff surgery on right shoulder (right handed) on New Year's Eve 1999, played my first tournament (outfield) in June 2000, but didn't get back to 100% until the following year. After that it was better than ever.

Left shoulder, February 2010, played in August, 2010.

Pay attention to your physical therapist, but you may need to challenge him/her a little. They're not always prepared for folks our age wanting to get back to sports.


July 14, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Tournaments
Discussion: 52./275

That's the difference I noticed playing in the NSA Senior World Series in Gadsden last year; a lot more bounce in the ball. I didn't notice any significant difference in the distance.
July 6, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Tournaments
Discussion: Aggie Land Classic

Is this going to be a decent facility? Got to wonder why the change hasn't been publicized two weeks before the event.
July 2, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Rules of the game
Discussion: You Make The Call II

Not an umpire but, assuming it left fair territory before passing 1B or 3B and assuming it was not touched be a player, it would be a foul ball.
June 30, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Tournaments
Discussion: Texas State Championships - How were the fields and other Facilities?

For anyone who played in Houston this weekend, how were the fields and other facilities at the Houston Sportsplex? We got such bad reports after the SPA tournament there in May that we opted not to go this weekend? I know that improvements were promised: any sign of them?
June 29, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: strike mat width

Bob,

The mat shown on the SPA site is actually 21" x 35". The SSUSA rule book on this site on this site specifies 19" x 34.5". Home plate is 17" wide. I think both organizations expanded it a couple of years ago. Why they are different is anybody's guess. Our league in Richardson is still using one 17" wide, I believe.
May 23, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Heart of Texas (Georgetown)

Certainly didn't mean to take away from his championship. I would have been proud to win as well. But he was congratulating the organizers on a well-run tournament, and I thought the 65's and 70's got short-changed. For the most part, I enjoy every tournament I go to, but some more than others, This was one of the others.
May 22, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Heart of Texas (Georgetown)

I noticed that no one in the 65 and 70 age groups jumped in here to join in the congratulations. The heavy rains Wednesday night delayed games by 3-4 hours on Thursday. Not the organizers fault. However, the decision to play 5 inning games with batters starting with a 2-2 count (not 1-1 or 3-2) and get everything back on schedule by the end of the day Thursday, put the whole burden of the rain delay on the 65's and 70's,

The seeding of the tournament was a little different, also. Two pool games to split the age group in to two divisions, then two more pool game to seed teams within each division into a single elimination tournament.

I am not saying I won't come back, but I this wouldn't be my preferred way of handling things.
May 3, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Preferred tournament wants, Short replies, please.

tattooball,

It would be interesting to see a detailed analysis of the costs involved: field rental, insurance, umpires, balls, other supplies, publicity, sanction fees, profits, etc. I'm sure there are costs involved that most of us aren't aware off.

It would seem to me that, as in most enterprises, there would be fixed costs involved that could be amortized over more teams at larger tournaments.

I hear a lot of complaints about tournament entry fees. My experience, playing for an unsponsored team, is that my share of the entry fee is a relatively small part of my total cost of attending an out-of-town tournament.

For the recent qualifier in Tulsa, the entry fee was $350. Split 13 ways, that came to $27/player. I spent about $90 for gas, $96 for two nights in the hotel (a real bargain), and about $60 for food for the wife and me. My total cost was about $273, so my share of the entry fee was about 10% of my cost. $10 one way of the other wouldn't have altered my decision to attend.
April 30, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: 70 FT BASES

A couple points with reference to some of the posts above without intending to come down on either side of the discussion:

If you played 6 games over 2 days, batted 4 times in each game, and hit an inside-the-park HR in each at bat (which most would agree is an extreme example) you would have run an extra 480 feet over a two day period. That can't have much impact on one's endurance.

I agree with the strategy of infielders playing at the same depth as with 65 foot bases, but doesn't that negate 70 foot bases as a safety measure and make it more about changing the dynamics of the game?

Crusher, the infields in Tulsa were extremely slow due to the wet conditions. A lot of ground balls were fielded that might not have been on faster infields. By the same token, had the ball been getting to infielders quicker, as it would on dry fields, there would have been an opportunity for even more DP's with the longer bases. I'm not sure how that shakes out, but I don't think Tulsa should be taken as conclusive one way or the other.


April 29, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: General and miscellaneous
Discussion: Preferred tournament wants, Short replies, please.

1. $300-350 for good qualifier. Entry fee is a small % of the total cost (housing, travel, etc.) It's significance gets blown out of proportion.
2. 5 GG
3. 2 days if it can be done without night games, or unless there is a big enough bracket to justify more games (you've spent the money to get there, you may as well play as many as possible).
4. Round Robin
5. Senior bats
6. 44/375
7. 70 ft (play 65AAA, moving to 70's next year)
8. No mixed brackets
9. Qualifer: Team trophy to winner
Major events: Team trophy for top three teams; plaques or jackets for winning team
members

April 15, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Website comments
Discussion: Time to change the format of the board

It helps to know how to stay logged in, but it would still be nice to be able to insert links to other sites.

March 25, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Players looking to join a team
Discussion: Softball Situation in Oregon

Thanks, Curveball. Good information. I'm sure I've done crazier things than drive 100 miles to play ball, but 100 miles for league ball might be a bit of a stretch.
March 24, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Players looking to join a team
Discussion: Softball Situation in Oregon

Thanks to all above for the info.
March 24, 2013
TexasTransplant
Topic: Players looking to join a team
Discussion: Softball Situation in Oregon

Wife+daughters+grandkids > than my love of warm weather.

Raised two kids, saw them get excellent educations, and what do they do. Marry Yankees and migrate to Oregon. Go figure!
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