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Discussion: Youtube video explaining difference between Wrist Snap & Wrist Rollover Swing Makeover #7

Posted Discussion
April 1, 2013
bogie
Men's 55
151 posts
Youtube video explaining difference between Wrist Snap & Wrist Rollover Swing Makeover #7
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Doqu5vwtqbk

copy and paste this to view.
We show using pro swings, how bat lag creates more power potential if the snap is achieved in sync with the hips. Then we discuss one of the most misunderstood parts of the swing...a true axe snap into impact and the true rollover which comes after impact.

all prior 6 episodes and all future ones can be linked from here.
http://www.sportstechnique.com/youtubeswing-makeover.html
April 1, 2013
Shut Up & Pitch
55 posts



I can see how this video helps those that use the "hand above hand" (baseball type grip), but how about the guys that use the "hand on top of hand" (softball) Rose grip?

Which is better for slow pitch softball?


April 2, 2013
bogie
Men's 55
151 posts
Like many, I too actually use a full overlap grip, ala top hand resting over bottom hand, but demonstrated conventional to show it better and to relate to the majority that use a top hand on the bat handle. That said, if you use an overlap grip, the swing mechanics should be the same. The top hand, which sits on top of the bottom hand, should still have the pointer finger knuckle (on the inside of the palm of the top hand), situated on the bat handle, so that the top hand has a solid and direct contact with the handle against that bone. I think some hitters just hold the bat handle in the space between the pointer finger and thumb...where it is just soft tissue that has a lot of give. This is a sloppy grip and does not give the top hand as much ability to solidly push against the handle of the bat, thus losing leverage. If you still try to line up your knocking knuckles on the overlap or if you bring your wrists in closer together, it puts the hands in a stronger position..and allows that inside knuckle to contact better.. Some put two finger back on top too..
A lot of the top young pros and seniors are mixed on using the overlap, conventional, or some combo in between...and all have good success.
April 2, 2013
sliplayer
Men's 60
70 posts
I use the overlap grip and I have for some time. This process works great for that type of grip. As far as which one is best is probably a personal preference. Although I did pick up some good distance switching to this grip but it did take some time to get use to it.
SLi
April 2, 2013
taits
Men's 65
4344 posts
I agree on that. Perhaps there is just enough protection from the material used that it dampers the hit enough to keep from further damage for a short time.
Good videos on that though in any case.
April 2, 2013
taits
Men's 65
4344 posts
Whops went to wrong thread.
April 2, 2013
Spin
1 posts
A rookie level question:
The video does a great job in showing the snap and then the roll over after impact and that is clear but the racket and lead arm drills in the videos and DVD's show rotation starting very early. How does this work with the snap?
April 2, 2013
bogie
Men's 55
151 posts
very good question...the end of the snap and the start of the roll occur within a fraction of a second...there can be a slight start to the roll (or break) of the lead wrist at impact, and you do see on a lot of swings where the lead wrist has just started to roll at bit and but the top hand is still palm up. This is acceptable and powerful, however we find that too many rec hitters start to roll over earlier and earlier, and eventually develop the habit of rolling and not snapping into the swing. In Ted Williams book, the Science of Hitting, he talked about an axe snap into impact with perhaps just a slight break of the wrists at impact. Later, when he coached, he backed off any talk of a roll at impact...stating purely a axe snap.
We have found, its a superior method to try and separate the snap completely from the roll for most hitters..its better to be a bit late than too early, especially when being early seems to lead to more and more roll over time before impact. If you snap good, you will always get the correct roll after, however, if you start the roll too early or have too much before impact, the snap suffers greatly. Try it both ways and see what you find out.
In most racquet drills, the lead wrist is still palm down at impact, as is the lead arm drills. The lead wrist has turned some, but it is still basically in a palm down position, not rolled over.
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