http://seniorsoftball.com/?page=12

 
SIGN IN:   Password     »Sign up

Message board   »Message Board home    »Sign-in or register to get started

Online now: 1 member: Chick50; 50 anonymous
Change topic:

Discussion: Eye Bounch

Posted Discussion
Dec. 19, 2009
Goater
54 posts
Eye Bounch
I'm fairly certain that many outfielders have had problems with, what I call eye bounce, when running down a fly ball.

It doesn't happen everytime I run after a ball, but it has been happening with increasing frequency.

Any suggestions on how to avoid eye bounce, or at least tame it?
Dec. 19, 2009
zonk
56 posts
I notice this when I run heel to toe after a ball. Try running on the balls of your feet. This should help.
Dec. 19, 2009
diehard
Men's 55
245 posts
I agree with Zonk. When I was a sophomore in High School, I played centerfield. I once had a ball hit in front of me and I had the same problem, the bounce, when I ran in to get it. When I told my manager what had happened, he said that I was running"flat footed" and that I should run on the balls of my feet like zonk said. I have not had the problem since.
Dec. 19, 2009
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
This problem is generally associated with fatigue. When we tire we get a bit lazy and tend to run flat footed or heel to toe.
There are certain pain issues that can also cause us to run differently.
The only answer I have found is the same as Zonk recommends, stay on the balls of your feet.
Dec. 19, 2009
ShaneV
Men's 55
382 posts
I never noticed this when I was young.

As I got older playing slowpitch, I did
notice it. I learned to push hard at
first moving to the ball, then in the
last few steps to the ball, rise up on
the balls of my feet and try to "float".
Made a big difference following the
ball to the glove.

When you're forced to go hard all the
way to the ball, may still be an issue.
This is when the great outfielder
leaves his feet. May also go into a
slide to meet the ball at ground level,
thus buying time to intersect the
flight of the ball just before it
reaches the ground.

By far the best opportunity to learn the
more advanced techniques of defensive
play is observation. I've had the
chance to watch many great players over
the years and practice the amazing
techniques they use.

ShaneV
Dec. 21, 2009
valgus6
3 posts
If you strengthen the muscles that stabilize the eyeball, you can improve your ability to track the ball. The best way to do this is to use a mini trampoline. Bounce up and down while focusing on a spot on the ceiling. Do this for several weeks and you should see improvement.
Dec. 22, 2009
Paco13
365 posts
Very good advise. Things like this is what we need on this board. Thanks.
Dec. 22, 2009
taits
Men's 65
4365 posts
The rocking from the heel to the ball of the foot is the bounce you get.
Good advice or you might try glasses with lens stabilization... like cameras have.
if there be such a thing... Merry Christmas Guys.
Dec. 22, 2009
Goater
54 posts
I've posted this on other forums .. the "run on the balls of your feet' is usually the first solution that is offered ... I'm skeptical because I've tried this solution in the past and it hasn't seemed to make much difference.

I played last weekend and I didn't have the problem with "eye bounce" on the two fly balls that were hit to me, even though I believe that I ran to to ball "heel to toe"

someone, in another forum,suggested that running with your mouth closed was the solution ... I'm as inclined to accept this as the "run on the balls of your feet" solution

the bottom line is .. that I know thatsometimes it happens and sometimes it does not happen .. just searching for a reality check
Dec. 22, 2009
Omar Khayyam
994 posts
True story:

I have eye bounce and I mention it to a teammate. He tells me the solution is to run on the balls of my feet. Sounds wise to me.

Next inning, I'm in left field and a player hits a low fly to my left in the outfield. I remember the balls of my feet advice, run to the ball, put my glove up (very little eye bounce) and miss the ball completely!

Maybe goater is right that running on the balls of the feet is not the cure-all one might think.
Dec. 23, 2009
truhitter
25 posts
omar have you had your eyes checked lately i had same problem was told i needed glasses
Dec. 23, 2009
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
Technically all running should occur on the balls of your feet. That is just sound running form, seperate from whatever benefits it might have for this thing guys are calling "eye bounce".

Just curious, because I never had, has anyone heard of that term before this thread? I understand the concept, though it probably has much more to do with a non-smooth, jarring running style that is making the head/entire body move up and down than it does the eyes actually "bouncing".

Dec. 23, 2009
wagon487
Men's 50
522 posts
Run with you mouth closed. End of thread. It's true, try it!
Dec. 23, 2009
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
wagon, would you please explain biomechanically how/why that works?

That might go a long way toward ending the discussion.
Dec. 23, 2009
mad dog
Men's 60
3932 posts
one as a lot have said,don't run flat footed,get on the balls of your feet.dirty how much running is there on the mound,,hmmmmm.
Dec. 23, 2009
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
sad puppy, you pitch. You should know.

My wife both ran and coached track for years. My son ran, and my daughter was a nationally-ranked runner when she was younger. I have been around enough running coaches to have developed at least a basic understanding of form and mechanics.

Not to mention you seem to be in agreement.
Dec. 23, 2009
einstein
Men's 50
3114 posts
What a great question and what terrific
responses and suggestions.
2 things I have found relating to eye bounce:
First, I find in my it's a function of confidence and anticipation which I have found for me
is key to me being able to play anywhere
near my ability.
It's possible you're confidence is less than what it was and you're not assuming you're going to see the ball well and catch it.
Second, I use judgment which happens
next to instantly
which tells me where and about how far/fast
I have to run.
Then I look away and run
to where I judged the ball to be,
then I look up
and find the ball.
This keeps from having to "track it" so much.

Dec. 23, 2009
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
Here's an answer from a so called Optometrist friend, well not really a true friend, more of an accuaintance, ok he's purely a D...Head.

"There is a thing called oppositional eye movement which is actually an illusion of movement. As the body or head moves, the eyes do a correctional opposite movement which makes the object appear to move.
The visual center of the brain is actually in the occipital lobe stimulation to that part of the head also produces apparent movement. You can decrease the movement by decreasing the amount the head moves..
So... in your case.... a fairly immobile object ..... I would not think you wouldn't notice it. Running with less jumping movement... a smoother running style would minimize it. Or... be like me.... just don't move and it will never be a problem. I am assuming you mean without glasses on.
Movement of objects with glasses on produces another type of movement caused by the movement of the spectacles....

S0. hope that helps... or at lease confuses you more, by the way.... seems like this oppositional movement problem gets worse with age.... like everyf..kingthing else."

So there you have it, I think. Thanks Doc! I hope you really enjoyed your Brownies!


Dec. 23, 2009
wagon487
Men's 50
522 posts
If you run with your mouth open your head will bob up and down while running. No not like a bobble doll!
Just enough to make your eyes move.
Close your mouth and it stops. Don't know how it works, just does. And it takes pratice.
Dec. 23, 2009
jim16
Men's 65
169 posts
Good thread. I like to teach my outfielders to track the flight of the ball like a "cat" not a "dog". A dog bounces and runs hard. A cat crouches and keeps its head still and totally under control. Think like a cat in the last few steps and the bouncing phenomenon will go wawy.
Dec. 23, 2009
einstein
Men's 50
3114 posts
wagon. way to go, bro.

To quote Gene Wilder in 'Young Frankenstein',
"This could work!!!"

I think concentrating on something
helps occupy and focus the mind
especially when under pressure.

They do something in the theater
that's of the same thing.
They bring actors up on stage
of an empty theatre and ask them
how they feel and tend to hear
varying degrees of anxiety from the group.
Then the actors are told to count seats
in the theatre, one by one
and something amazing happens.
Their nerves dissipate greatly
if not completely go away.
And nervousness and anxiety
can make that ball move like
a butterfly in the wind.
Dec. 24, 2009
diehard
Men's 55
245 posts
OK, so let's see if I understand what to do if my manager puts me in the outfield. Keep my mouth shut, start counting the number of seats that surround the field, and run on the balls of my feet. Got it! I hope my manager keeps me at first. And Wagon, you still havn't explained the Biomechanics to us yet, we're all waiting. Have a very Merry Christmas everyone!
Dec. 24, 2009
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
jim16,
I saw your outfield in Phoenix,they didn't look like they were running like any dog or cat I have ever seen....ha,ha,
Have safe Holiday season.
Dec. 24, 2009
L A 29
Men's 50
22 posts
Ok guys lots of good advice,it's actually very simple.Whatever it takes for you to stay smooth while running.Some guys just can't make some plays becuase they can't get to the ball with a smooth rythm, they run out of control thus the head movement.You have to run smooth and relaxed and keep the head still.When I experience this problem it is mainly on the balls that are high pops and a real long way to run forward,that's when you start catching the ball in the heel.About two weeks ago i had this situation and I ran a long ways reached out to catch the ball and i actually caught it completely with my barehand (ouch)that's how far i missed it by.Sorry very long.Back to being relaxed,some college and professional players in all sports are using a fitted special type of mouth piece that makes them relax which leads to better running,jumping,catching,shooting,etc.. Another thing at our older ages, it is a fact that we start to loose focus of the ball at the last 4 feet before it reaches us,so this is also a key factor for some guys missing balls.Also I see some guys running for the ball with their arm and glove stretched out while they are running,not good.Happy Holidays and all the best for 2010.
Dec. 24, 2009
mad dog
Men's 60
3932 posts
dipty,where do you see that i said i agree with,no where.yeah i do pitch but mainly with the kids,play the field with the seniors.
Dec. 25, 2009
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
"one as a lot have said,don't run flat footed,get on the balls of your feet"

Sounds like agreement to me.

Pitching is pitching. What, being a "kid's" pitcher is different than a senior one?
Dec. 25, 2009
armiho211
Men's 70
410 posts
#6 / JIM16--i played LC / RC for jim16 in phoenix, we could have done a better job if it wasnt for the billions of gnats that got in your eyes and had to swallow when running, it's amazing how the gnats only came out when we were in the field. bottom line, we tried like hell, just didnt work out. it was great tournament, had a lot of fun, met a lot of great guys that enjoy the game as much as i do. a lot of guys our age cant do this. MERRY XMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR. see ya on the field next year. frank a.
Dec. 26, 2009
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
armiho211,
same to you,haven't heard from Jim lately,do you know how his house is coming?
Take care,
Kenny
Sign-in to reply or add to a discussion or post your own message and start a new discussion. If you don't have a message board account, please register for a free nickname. It will only take a moment.
Senior Softball-USA
Phone: (916) 326-5303
Fax: (916) 326-5304
2701 K Street, Suite 101A
Sacramento, CA 95816
Send us e-mail
Senior Softball-USA is dedicated to informing and uniting the Senior Softball Players of America and the World. Senior Softball-USA sanctions tournaments and championships, registers players, writes the rulebook, publishes Senior Softball-USA News, hosts International Softball Tours and promotes Senior Softball throughout the world. More than 1.5 million men and women over 40 play Senior Softball in the United States today. »SSUSA History  »Privacy policy

Follow us on Facebook

Partners