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Discussion: Medical exemption

Posted Discussion
July 29
Mikelmart

153 posts
Medical exemption
I just heard of something called a medical exemption.
What is it?
What is the criteria?
July 29
softball4b
Men's 70
1250 posts
Medical exemption
Call Sacramento.
July 29
DaveDowell
Men's 70
4351 posts
Medical exemption
Mike ... It's an application by a player to have his current "Rating Index Experience History" reduced from its current "number" to something lower ... The player has to detail (and provide verifiable evidence) that some medical condition or circumstance makes it difficult/impossible to compete effectively at his current rating experience level ... Just the fact of having a medical procedure done, like a hip or knee replacement, for example, almost always improves the health/mobility of the player and generally does not merit the rating index reduction ... I don't believe we've done any formal statistical analysis, but my personal sense of it is that players with a Major+ rating index designation seem to be the most frequently impacted applicants seeking a reduction ... Good luck!

July 29
grayhitter59
Men's 60
345 posts
Medical exemption
Hey Dave, I really can't believe you would make a statement that a hip replacement would "improve health/mobility". I got news for you, I have a piece of stainless steal in my body that I was not born with, did the pain I had when I got injured go away. YES, but my mobility and speed will never be the same. So as far a down grading someone for replacement surgery absolutely no doubt in my mind.

I don't know where you are getting your information, but you better stop watching CNN or Fox news.LMAO
July 29
softball4b
Men's 70
1250 posts
Medical exemption
Believe it or not I kind of disagree with Dave. Being immobile and then being semi mobile is not the same as being mobile. From the guy with hip and knee replacement. That being said the replacements today are much better than before so there is that. I think and could be wrong the medical reclassification is 120 days from approval as opposed to submission. If you submit today, best case scenario you are probably looking at 1/1/23 for an effective date if approved.
July 29
DaveDowell
Men's 70
4351 posts
Medical exemption
Manny and Mike4b ... Gracious disagreements are fine here! ... My mobility observation is based on personal experience from day before to less than three weeks after a complete hip replacement ... The day before I could not walk unaided and doing so was accompanied by excruciating pain ... I had a 95% reduction in pain within an hour of exiting the surgical suite and after three weeks of (an eight week) rehabilitation regimen, I was dramatically MORE mobile and agile than any time in the immediately preceding three years ... My statement wasn't theoretical in the slightest, but accurately reflects my own circumstance ...
July 29
softball4b
Men's 70
1250 posts
Medical exemption
DD You just made my point..;-) Runner Blue..Actually hip was no big deal, knee totally different animal. Me asking for runner while in the box.
July 29
MurrayW
Men's 65
221 posts
Medical exemption
From my personal experience of having 3 knee replacements (right knee partial 11 years ago and full 4 years ago, left knee 1.5 years ago) I agree with Dave's pain and mobility statement.

Before my partial knee replacement, I went through 2 or 3 years of knee pain that led to back pain. I could force myself to get through a tournament, but due to the pain in both the knee and back, I couldn't workout or take batting practice. My play deteriorated going from a 50 Major Plus player to not being good enough to play on my Major Plus team and playing AAA and Major with my friends.

After the surgery I had no pain and I became more mobile so I was able to workout and take batting practice. I became a much better player than I was then and able to be a productive Major Plus player after that. At 68, I am able to play on a 55, 60, and 65 Major Plus team.

With that said, I think each surgery and situation is different so I am not going to assume that everyone else will have the same results as I had. But, I do not think that a replacement part should automatically qualify you to be rated at a lower level. There should be some kind of evaluation you have to go through with input from directors and other coaches that know you.

Murray Williams
55 Major Plus Rock-n-Legends
60 Majopr Plus Texas Crush
July 29
MurrayW
Men's 65
221 posts
Medical exemption
Hit the post button accidentally.
60 Major Plus Texas Crush
65 Major Plus Texas Crush
Aug. 1
bogie
Men's 65
448 posts
Medical exemption
At 68 yrs. old and having a knee replacement a year ago, and 2 months ago hip replacement, I have to agree with Dave. I have not played the last 3 years because I was basically a cripple. Already its a huge improvement. Certainly not the person I was 6 years ago physically, and with muscle memory lost, just starting to hit and relearn swing, but in my case its a tremendous improvement, with more mobility and working on re building strength and swing. I think if your in your 50s, the benefit would be even more dramatic. That said I was never a defensive player of any impact so can't comment on that aspect.
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