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Discussion: Big League Dreams Fields

Posted Discussion
Aug. 12, 2013
hoovedog
Men's 50
65 posts
Big League Dreams Fields
Is it me, or does anyone else having knee problems, and back problems from playing at BLD,, I can play 6-8 games on dirt and grass,Senior ball, and feel o.k. and play 1-2 games, at BLD, with the kids, and be hurting the next day..Does the concrete base make that big of a difference, or are the kids, just running me to death?
Aug. 12, 2013
taits
Men's 65
4250 posts
Maybe a little of each. Heat off the fields can also play a part.
Aug. 12, 2013
Omar Khayyam
958 posts
I think Taits is on to something with the heat factor, especially in a multi-game tournament. Artificial turf can be considerably hotter than natural turf. In the fall or spring (or winter where I play), the extra warmth is welcomed, but in the hot summer, it can easily be 120 on the field. Playing in that kind of heat is enervating. And in BLD parks, where bringing in any beverage other than water is prohibited, I notice a lot of guys don't drink enough fluid.

hoovedog, in my experience, where I play more than 100 games a year on artificial turf (very common in California and Nevada where saving water is a high priority), I find the artificial turf easier on my knees and back than natural turf.

Another factor is that some BLD parks have artificial turf on the infield and natural turf in the outfield. Outfielders usually wear cleats and they put more pressure on their feet while running the bases. Some of my teammates wear their turf shoes the entire game, even if they play in the outfield and lose some traction without longer cleats.
Aug. 12, 2013
Jawood
Men's 50
784 posts
The positives outweigh any negatives when it comes to a turf infield vs a dirt infield with these bats. Infielders will understand!
Aug. 12, 2013
hoovedog
Men's 50
65 posts
I have to agree with all these Posts,,Plus not only are my knees and back going,, must be my mind also,, being 61, playing with 21 yr olds. Playing left center, a little speedy kid hit a shot in the gap,, caught it on one bounce , threw to the cutoff and the kid was almost on 3rd.. I must have been in the twilight zone..
Aug. 13, 2013
swing for the fences
Men's 50
975 posts
I find running the bases on some the natural field are like running on concrete.. prefer the turf now... IMO
Aug. 14, 2013
taits
Men's 65
4250 posts
Infields vary quite a bit according to the quality of soil, ie dirt, clay, sand, rock composition.
I worked built fields for over a decade municipal and private and have seen most types out there in the valley. Clay is the worst cause it hardens up to cement like top soon after. Had one where they wanted volcanic crushed rock embedded in the soil to 'allow' drainage. I still have scars on my knees from sliding on it. Real road rash as it were. AG soil that had gypsum in it stays relatively pliable & playable and drains well. But it is costly all the ag land if being built on now.
Soil mixes thy have for them improve the top base and allow drainage and playability too.
Astroturf gets hot and the chopped tired thy saturate the tops with, absorb the hear of summer and reflect back on the fields. HOT. Also used to slow the balls. Have also seen sand used on them for that.
Either way both teams are playing under the same conditions.
Aug. 14, 2013
Jawood
Men's 50
784 posts
There is no "astroturf" any longer, which was basically a thin carpet on concrete. What they have now is "fieldturf" which is totally different. May be hot, but it's worth it!
Aug. 15, 2013
taits
Men's 65
4250 posts
It is a reference still commonly used. And they do make it like they do carpet. That can be seen on; How it's made.
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