http://www.softballcamp.com/

 
SIGN IN:   Password     »Sign up

Message board   »Message Board home    »Sign-in or register to get started

Online now: 3 members: Bella911, Gonedeep43, LeeLee50; 69 anonymous
Change topic:

Discussion: to screen or not to screen

Posted Discussion
April 19, 2010
Punch
Men's 60
12 posts
to screen or not to screen
I am in favor of using a screen. I have been playing for two and a half years in a league that uses a screen to protect the pitcher. Not once has a pitcher been struck by a batted ball. Nor have I witnessed the screen being hit by any throw, either from the infield OR the outfield. The catchers hit it quite often on the return back to the pitcher. The sanction to the batter, on hitting the screen with a batted ball, is an out. If I were king, I would modify the out to a strike. Because no one has total bat control. In our league, it in not uncommon to face a pitcher who is plus 70 or more. The screen let's you use the whole field without worry that you might end some players life, or injure him. Quite a few of the league players have perfected the art of hitting the middle safely while avoiding the screen. And if they should... "oops, sorry I didn't mean to hit you." Then the screen will reward you with an out. And the pitcher lives to play another inning. I have been playing ball for over 43 years and have witnessed many an injury, including two deaths, during ball games. At this stage in life, most of us play for the fun, competition, recreation, travel,and exercise. It also inspires most of us to stay in shape. This is my opinion, on the use of a screen. If safety for the most vulnerable player on the field is of major concern, then the use of a screen is the safest way to go. Then as far as the pitcher is concerned, he can then face whatever equipment is brought to bear against him in safety. As far as the other infield positions go, distance from the batter, a frequently drug infield, and unlimited arc would go a long ways towards nullifying todays technology, and giving the defense a better chance to use their skills with an increase in safety.
April 19, 2010
Omar Khayyam
994 posts
Punch, great post! I have had a similar experience playing in a league with a mandated screen for ten years! Other options besides an out for hitting the screen (which seems kind of drastic) is the strike, the dead ball, and the strike only after a two strike count (otherwise a dead ball).
April 20, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
Why are you guys willing to sell the game out for the sake of insecure old guys with fragile egos?
April 20, 2010
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
Punch,
It is a good post, but where do we stop trying to change the game most of us grew up playing.? I play 3b and SS, while playing 3b, I have had "many" a shot come down the line, what the screens are leaning too are, next 3b , ss and 1b will be using them.
When I had my 16 and 12 year old grandsons watching me play one weekend(they both play select baseball and high school baseball) they couldn't understand the home plate rule, the committment line and a few other senior rules.(5 rules, then its your turn to bat)
I was playing league a few weeks ago and I was playing ss, a buddy was playing 3b and a missile was hit inches from his face, HE NEVER SAW IT and has since told the coach he wants to either play right field or catch !
We "all" understand the risks of getting out of bed every morning, THANK GOD, we all get to play another day !
I play with several really good pitchers, and NONE OF THEM WANT THE SCREEN OR WANT TO USE SAFETY EQUIPTMENT ! I fyou pitch and you want to wear anything to protect you, that's your decision.

NO SCREENS IN SENIOR SOFTBALL !!!! PLEASE !!!!!
April 20, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
#6, great job of "getting it"!!!!!!!
April 20, 2010
Robo2
222 posts
why do people complain about changing the game when it comes to trying something that is intended to be a safety issue?

why are we changing the game by limiting Home Runs? The game would be faster with unlimited HRs and the good teams would be elevated to a higher level quicker; and there would be less balls hit up the middle by the power bats because they are out of HRs or because they have a limit and don't want to hit a solo. With a 5 run inning the game would be much faster.

I would like to hear the arguement against unlimited HRs. IT's not for saving time; it's not for making teams equal; what is the reason? If one says that nobody will chase the balls, then have 2 balls and SB12s as backups. Teams will chase the balls.
April 20, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
There is no good argument against unlimited home runs. Just like there is no good argument for run limits. Or time limits. Just terrible ways to change what was a good game, all to accommodate the fragile egos of old guys.
April 20, 2010
taits
Men's 65
4357 posts
Only 1 that Ii can think of, Cost. That being the Umps will want\demand more pay for no doubt the longer games that will be the result.
I agree though it sucks with limits.
April 20, 2010
Capt Kirk
408 posts
#6, it looks like you will be covering both SS & 3B, have another red bull and go for it. We will see you guys in Georgetown.
April 20, 2010
mad dog
Men's 60
3932 posts
capt kirk,mmm haven't u seen #6 play,mmmm DOH,LOL.
April 20, 2010
mad dog
Men's 60
3932 posts
dang forgot to add,who are you with,i'm with the dallas spurs.
April 20, 2010
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
mad dog,
Do you mean to tell me that after you played with the Dallas Spurs in Georgetown, They kept you ? LOL

Didn't you say you were not going to Baytown ?
April 20, 2010
Capt Kirk
408 posts
Mgr, TX Tornado's out of San Antonio, we will be playing in Georgetown, Dallas, College Station, Boerne, Phoenix, and course WE would like to go back to the TOC in Florida.

The San Antonio Senior Softball League (SASSL) will be hosting a tournament in San Antonio on August 7th and 8th at Alvo Jo Fisher Softball Fields. All 50's, 60's, 65's, & 70's mens team are invited.
Last year we had twenty (20) teams that participated in our tournament. We hope to see you in San Antonio on August 7 & 8th for a great tournanment and a great time by all.
April 20, 2010
neck10
493 posts
punch good luck with your screen it took me 2yrs to get screen in our over 55 leauge.I put a pitcher in the hospital for three days 10 yrs ago hit him in the fore head.he doesnt remember thos three days or what happened to him got two strikes on me pitched me outside with something I couldnt handle so instead of taking it & relying on the umpire to call it a ball I hit it & thats where it went .but good luck to many negative guys like dirty who I dont think wants to see anyone get hurt but is willing to take that chance instead of trying some safty precautions.we all need to get up the next day after the games but they cant keep you from using face maske & shin guards chest protector whtever you want,good luck by the way I purchased & donated the screen to our leauge.
April 20, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
neck, correct I do not want to see anyone get hurt, but this is a sport and it happens.

You want a safety precaution? GET RID OF THE SPECIAL BATS! Making the infield a miniature golf course is not the answer, nor should it be. Ask your fellow old guys to check their egos.

I wonder if these guys bumper bowl so they can score better. Or use a trampoline so they can dunk.
April 20, 2010
Gary33
143 posts
I've seen first hand a severe injury caused by a batted ball. It's not fun to see this and not know if the player is going to be O.K. Screens are a good thing. My question where is the screen placed. With the pitcher being able to pitch from uo to 10 feet behind the rubber?
April 20, 2010
Enviro-Vac
Men's 60
395 posts
No screen please…don’t take away the potential double play. Allowing the pitchers to pitch from further back would help with pitcher reaction time and would also give a pitcher a few more options on what kind of pitch to throw which in turn might lower the scores a little. Also, any bat exceeding 1:20 bpf is not required in softball.
April 20, 2010
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
Gary33,
How can you say "screens are a good thing" and you don't even know where there placed ?
April 20, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
Sounds like Gary might be one of those guys who would do anything to keep his special bats and protect his insecurities about his ability to hit.
April 20, 2010
Capt Kirk
408 posts
We played in the Senior Games in San Antonio on April 10th, and our pitcher (who is a solid defensive player) had some rockets hit at him by some players who should have known better. On of my concerns as a manager is to protect my players (especially my pitcher). One of the issue that has not been addressed is teams that are playing in the lower ratings (AA & AAA) and have major and major plus players on their rosters.I would suggest that all tournament directors screened each team roster to ensure that all teams are in compliance.
April 20, 2010
Capt Kirk
408 posts
IS: On of my concerns
SB: One of my concerns
April 20, 2010
Omar Khayyam
994 posts
Gary33, the answer to where screens could be placed might differ from association to association. In my league, since the purpose is to protect the pitcher, the screen is placed wherever the pitcher wants it (within reason) and the pitcher moves it.

Some pitchers place it in front of their body and only their pitching arm sticks out. Others like it close to the rubber. I like it about 6 feet in front of the rubber and to the side so I can field balls at me and for safety reasons, I only step behind the screen if there is a sun problem or the hitter is a slugger with a known propensity to zoom it up the middle.

In tournament play, it would probably have to be lined up in proximity to the rubber and/or where the pitcher is pitching from. Say, max of six feet in front of pitcher and max of 1 foot to left or right (it is not intended to be a barrier for a hit to second base or shortstop).

Those who hate screens, like Dirty, will not like the practicality of this and will imagine all kind of scenarios where it is "unfair."

As most posters know, I am not a screen advocate as much as one who wants to see the end of senior bats and a return to the balanced game of just a decade ago.
April 21, 2010
Gary33
143 posts
Dirty and # 6 Go ahead and mock but I hope neither one of you take one off the skull and lay in a hospital fighting for your life. This could happen with any bat and ball combo not just Senior bats. Omar Khayyam thanks for your answer. As to Dirty's comments as always have no value.
April 21, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
It's a sport, we assume the risk. If you aren't willing to, play checkers.

And how do you advocate a rule that you don't know how it works?

Keep changing the game to feed your ego! Attaboy!
April 21, 2010
#6
Men's 60
1183 posts
Gary33,
I trully believe you want the game safer, and all of us should. But we take chances everyday of our life when we wake up and walk out the door.
Life's if full of chances.
I don't ever want to see "anyone" hurt !

GOOD LUCK THIS SEASON !
April 21, 2010
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
Anyone have a stat on how many serious injuries have taken place to pitchers Pre Senior Bat and since their introduction? Is it not an issue?
How many were from line drives or hops?

Add in advancing age, slower reaction.

How many balls have been hit in those periods? How many back thru the middle?
Sheer numbers alone and the law of average will proably prevail when it comes to being hit.

April 21, 2010
Dirty
Men's 50
1375 posts
And E4, my guess is that average would be VERY low.
April 21, 2010
stick8
1282 posts
Gary no one I know in all of softball wishes anyone to get drilled in the head and be hospitalized. But if your that concerned about protecting pitchers then it might be a good idea to strongly encourage pitchers to buy safety masks. Companies do make them specifically for slow pitch softball. Every year you see more and more pitchers opting for this.
April 21, 2010
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
If a rule needs to be added or changed, I would much rather see mandatory protection gear ruled on then a screen.
Or cool off the ball. We know the bats arent going away.
April 21, 2010
Airbosn
Men's 65
321 posts
E4/E6,
The below listed material(s) are there for your reading pleasure.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

Through the public information link on the AAOS home page (www.aaos.org), you can access fact sheets on injury prevention for many popular sports, including baseball. AAOS's phone number is 1-800-346-2267.

American Academy of Pediatrics

Review AAP's policy statement, Risk of Injuries from Baseball and Softball in Children 5 to 14 Years of Age - (http://www.aap.org/default.htm). AAP's phone number is 847-228-5097.

American Red Cross

If you coach a youth sports team, get advice from the American Red Cross on conditioning young athletes. ARC's phone number is 703-248-4222.

Brain Injury Association

BIA's fact sheet about sports and concussion safety (http://www.biausa.org/Prevfacts.htm) provides data on brain injuries for several sports, including baseball. Call BIA at 1-800-444-6443.

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

CPSC's phone number is 1-800-638-2772.

Little League Baseball, Inc.

Link to the Little League home page (www.littleleague.org) to access facts on health and safety.

National SAFE KIDS Campaign

Visit the SAFE KIDS home page (www.safekids.org) to access fact sheets on sports and recreation injuries, or call 202-662-0600.

References

The data and safety tips in this fact sheet were obtained from the following sources:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Baseball. Available at http://www.aaos.org/wordhtml/pat_educ/baseball.htm. Accessed July 8, 1999.

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Seminar (Sullivan J, Grana W, editors). The Pediatric Athlete. Park Ridge, IL: The Academy, 1990:141,149-151,259.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Risk of injury from baseball and softball in children 5 to 14 years of age. Pediatrics 1994;93(4):690-692.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Sports Medicine: Health care for young athletes. Elk Grove Village, IL: The Academy, 1991:148-150.

American Red Cross. Red Cross gears up to help prevent sports injuries this spring: coaches advised on proper conditioning of young athletes. News release, May 7, 1998.

Caine D, Caine C, Lindner K, editors. Epidemiology of Sports Injuries. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 1996:63-85.

CDC. Sliding-associated injuries in college and professional baseball - 1990-1991. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 1993;42(12):223,229-230.

Institute for Preventative Sports Medicine. Softball injuries: Phase I of a study on the costs, causes and prevention of recreational softball injuries. Available at http://users.aol.com/wwwipsm/pubs/softball_I.html. Accessed July 7, 1999.

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Baseball safety. CPSC publication #329. Washington, DC: The Commission.

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Reducing youth baseball injuries with protective equipment. Consumer Product Safety Review 1996;1(1):1-4.

Len Rizzuto
Environmental / Safety Specialist
April 21, 2010
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
Len, I have read most of them, thanks for helping make my point.
April 21, 2010
E4/E6
Men's 60
850 posts
Make that I have read "many" of them.
April 22, 2010
einstein
Men's 50
3114 posts
Pudge.
Brilliant and honest and all we need
to know.
Screens will protect the pitcher
and let the guys have the middle back
to hit the ball hard
and is the way to go as/if safety
is the key issue.
Right on.
April 22, 2010
einstein
Men's 50
3114 posts
That was punch not pudge.
Sorry.
Sign-in to reply or add to a discussion or post your own message and start a new discussion. If you don't have a message board account, please register for a free nickname. It will only take a moment.
Senior Softball-USA
Phone: (916) 326-5303
Fax: (916) 326-5304
2701 K Street, Suite 101A
Sacramento, CA 95816
Send us e-mail
Senior Softball-USA is dedicated to informing and uniting the Senior Softball Players of America and the World. Senior Softball-USA sanctions tournaments and championships, registers players, writes the rulebook, publishes Senior Softball-USA News, hosts International Softball Tours and promotes Senior Softball throughout the world. More than 1.5 million men and women over 40 play Senior Softball in the United States today. »SSUSA History  »Privacy policy

Follow us on Facebook

Partners